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Submitted by Newsroom on June 8, 2011 – 1:00 amNo Comment
 Latest Wyoming news, business and entertainment – 
 
 
     WYOMING FLOODING
     Groundwater contamination found in Lincoln wells
     CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP)
– Nearly half of the Sinclair golf course is
under water, and Lincoln County public health officials have found
three private water wells contaminated by high groundwater tables
caused by prolonged flooding.
County emergency management spokesman Stephen Malik says there
have been no reports of anyone becoming ill from drinking the
water.
     He says town water wells have checked out OK so far.
     Elsewhere in Wyoming on Tuesday, flooding continues in Carbon
County along the North Platte, Encampment and Little Snake Rivers.
However, officials say berms and sandbags are holding firm.
     They say about half of the 18-hole Sinclair golf course is
inundated by the North Platte.
     The Wyoming Game and Fish Department has closed campgrounds and
parking areas on the North Platte River in the Saratoga area due to
flooding.
    
     WILDERNESS RULES-LAWSUIT
     Utah plans to pursue wild lands lawsuit
     SALT LAKE CITY (AP)
– Utah officials are continuing to pursue a
lawsuit against the federal government over a public lands policy
the U.S. Interior Department withdrew last week.
     Gov. Gary Herbert’s spokeswoman, Ally Isom, says the lawsuit
won’t be withdrawn because the underlying issues remain and there
is uncertainty about what federal officials will do next.
     Interior Secretary Ken Salazar announced the policy in December,
which would have made millions of acres of undeveloped land
available for wilderness protection.
     Utah officials claim the policy circumvents state efforts to
determine what lands should be protected and hurts the state’s
economy.
     The governors in Alaska and Wyoming, meanwhile, say they won’t
withdraw a request to join the lawsuit until the policy is formally
rescinded by Salazar.
    
     LUMMIS-CONTRIBUTIONS
     Lummis gets campaign cash from Wyo. fund managers
     CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP)
– U.S. Rep. Cynthia Lummis received more
than $31,000 in campaign contributions from out-of-state financial
managers whose firms received Wyoming investments in a program she
championed as state treasurer.
     Lummis persuaded state officials to invest with Denver-based
Cheyenne Capital Fund in 2003. The fund now manages about $225
million in Wyoming investments.
     The Republican Lummis was elected to Congress in 2008 and
re-elected last year. Federal filings show that people associated
with Cheyenne Capital or firms in which it invested state money
donated $31,400 to Lummis’ campaigns
     Lummis’ office says the congresswoman didn’t actively solicit
contributions from the fund managers.
    
     ESCAPED INMATE-WYOMING
     Inmate escapes from NE Wyoming prison camp
     NEWCASTLE, Wyo. (AP)
– A man serving time for second-degree
murder has escaped from a minimum-security prison camp in
northeastern Wyoming.
     Officials say 56-year-old William Coomer was discovered missing
Tuesday afternoon from the Wyoming Honor Conservation Camp in
Newcastle. They say area law enforcement agencies and residents
were alerted as soon as he was found missing.
     Coomer was sentenced in 1982 to 20 years to life. He was paroled
in 1999 and sent to prison again in 2000 for a parole violation.
Authorities say he should be considered armed and dangerous.
     Coomer is described as white with brown hair and blue eyes. He
is 5 feet, 10 inches tall and about 170 pounds. People are urged to
call police at (307) 746-4486 if they see him.
     
     
     COLORADO RIVER STUDY
     Report on Colorado River notes climate change
     DENVER (AP)
– An interim report on a study of potential
imbalances in Colorado River water supply and demand predicts
challenges from climate change.
     The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and agencies in the seven states
in the river basin plan to release a final report next year. But an
interim report released Monday says that under one scenario,
droughts lasting at least five years are projected 40 percent of
the time over the next 50 years, which could reduce streamflows.
     The interim report documents progress on the study through Jan.
31. It doesn’t mention this year’s deep mountain snowpack in parts
of the West.
     More than 30 million people in Arizona, California, Nevada,
Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming depend on water supplied by
the Colorado River and its tributaries.
     
     
     SCHOOL-DRUG TESTING
     Wyo. high court upholds school drug testing
     CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP)
– The Wyoming Supreme Court has upheld the
legality of a school district rule requiring drug and alcohol
testing for students in after-school activities.
     Dozens of students and their parents had sued Goshen County
School District 1, claiming the testing violated students’
constitutional rights.
     But the Supreme Court has upheld a lower court ruling in favor of
the district. The justices ruled unanimously that the district has a
compelling interest in providing for students’ safety and welfare.
     State health department surveys have shown Goshen County at or
near the top for alcohol and drug use in recent years. A 2008
survey found that 52 percent of the 12th-graders were at risk of
harm from drug use.
    
     YELLOWSTONE VISITORS
     Yellowstone visitor numbers down so far this year
     YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP)
– The number of people
visiting Yellowstone National Park is down substantially so far
this year compared to last year’s record numbers.
     The park reports visitor numbers are down more than 11 percent
from January through May compared to the same period last year.
     A record 3.6 million people visited Yellowstone all last year.
Yellowstone’s peak season is yet to come: Typically as many people
visit in the first two weeks in July as during the first five
months of the year.
     Yellowstone has been unusually snowy this spring. The number of
visitors to the park last month was about 218,000, down nearly 13
percent from May 2010.
    
     YELLOWSTONE-EAST ENTRANCE
     Yellowstone East Entrance open 24-hours a day
     YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP)
– The East Entrance to
Yellowstone National Park is now fully open.
     The road between the park’s East Entrance and Fishing Bridge
Junction over Sylvan Pass had been open just during the nighttime
because of concern about avalanches.
     The was opened to travel 24-hours a day on Sunday night after
experts determined the snowpack above Sylvan Pass had stabilized.
     In addition, the road between Tower Fall over Dunraven Pass to
Canyon Village is expected to open to travel for the summer this
week.
     Crews also have resumed clearing snow from the last few miles of
U.S. 212, also known as the Beartooth Highway. The entire route
could be open next weekend.
    
     GRIZZLY KILLED
     Grizzly dies after being hit by car in Yellowstone
     HELENA, Mont. (AP)
– Yellowstone National Park officials say a
grizzly bear has been killed after a car struck it on the Grand
Loop Road.
     Park officials said in a statement Tuesday the driver hit the
417-pound adult male at 2 a.m. Thursday.
     The bear limped off the road and the driver did not get out of
the vehicle to investigate.
     Park rangers searched for the grizzly, but it wasn’t found until
a visitor spotted it Friday in a ditch near the Fountain Paint Pot
drive.
     There are about 150 of the threatened animals with ranges that
include portions of Yellowstone. About 600 live in the Greater
Yellowstone Ecosystem.
     Park rangers say vehicles kill more than 100 large animals in
Yellowstone annually. Thursday’s accident was the first grizzly
killed by a vehicle this year.
    
     CATTLE DRIVE-WYOMING
     Cattle drive planned in Grand Teton National Park
     MOOSE, Wyo. (AP)
– Authorities say the annual cattle drive in
Grand Teton National Park will cause some minor traffic delays this
weekend.
     About 250 cattle will be moved from Pinto Ranch near the park’s
eastern boundary to Elk Ranch, about 10 miles away, for summer
grazing on Saturday.
     Park spokeswoman Jackie Skaggs said wranglers will drive the
cattle along either side of Highway 26/287, which will remain open
to cars. But traffic will be stopped at Moran Junction to allow the
cattle to cross the Buffalo Fork Bridge. Drivers will be delayed by
about 30 minutes.
     Vehicles can take an alternative route through the park. But
Skaggs said many people don’t mind getting stopped in the annual
traffic jam, with some visitors staking out spots to get the best
view of the passing cows.
    

    
     (Copyright 2011 by The Associated Press.  All Rights Reserved.)

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