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Wyoming News from AP

Submitted by rebecca on September 25, 2013 – 11:20 amNo Comment

WEST NILE-HORSES

State vet: horses still need West Nile vaccine

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Despite the onset of fall, cases of West Nile Virus in horses continue to be reported throughout the state of Wyoming.

At least 15 West Nile horse cases have been diagnosed this season by the Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory.

State Veterinarian Jim Logan says the West Nile season can last until a hard frost.

The Wyoming Livestock Board veterinary staff recommends that owners vaccinate their horses if they have not done so already.

Horses are far more affected by the West Nile than other livestock and domestic animals. Signs of West Nile include initial flu-like symptoms, where the horse becomes lethargic and depressed, followed by weakness, incoordination and seizures.

Of those that become ill, about 30 percent die or need to be euthanized.

WYOMING WILDFIRES

Wyo. sees decrease in wildfires this year

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — The end of summer means that the major wildfire season is all but over in Wyoming.

While the number of fires and acreage burned is still being tabulated and more wildfires can start this fall,state forestry officials say this year’s fire season has been completely opposite from last year.

According to the Wyoming State Forestry Division, the cost of fighting fires on state and private land so far has totaled a preliminary $1.5 million. That compares to about $42 million for 2012.

The largest fire this summer burned about 25,000 acres in the Shoshone National Forest. That would have been small compared to 2012 when one fire burned nearly 100,000 acres.

Forestry officials attribute the better fire season to timely rain, fewer dry lightning strikes and better fire response.

BIGHORN FOREST-BEARS

Bighorn National Forests officials: bears active

SHERIDAN, Wyo. (AP) — U.S. Forest Service officials are warning visitors to the Bighorn National Forest that black bears are active on the forest this time of year and visitors should take precautions.

Forest Supervisor Bill Bass says black bears roam throughout the Bighorns. He says visitors should be prepared to share the forest with bears.

Visitors should keep a clean camp, keep cooking areas separate from sleeping areas and avoid sleeping in clothing they wore when cooking food.

Bass also encourages visitors to keep bear spray handy and know how to use it.

TETON VISITOR CENTER

Moose visitor center to close during winter

(Information in the following story is from: Jackson Hole (Wyo.) News And Guide, http://www.jhnewsandguide.com)

JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — The National Park Service has decided to close the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitor Center in Grand Teton National Park during the winter.

The center is located in Moose and typically serves as a hub for visitors to Grand Teton during wintertime, when the vast majority of the park’s services are closed for the season.

The closure means that Grand Teton will have no buildings other than bathrooms open to the public this winter.

Grand Teton chief of interpretation Vickie Mates says the decision for the winter closure was based purely on economics.

Mates tells the Jackson Hole News & Guide that the park will save about $100,000.

She says the center has few visitors in the winter.

The center is scheduled to close for the season Nov. 4.

CASPER SMOKING BAN

Casper says smoking referral count valid

(Information in the following story is from: Casper (Wyo.) Star-Tribune, http://www.trib.com)

CASPER, Wyo. (AP) — The city of Casper maintains that its city clerk legally rejected a smoking ban referendum and is not required to conduct a recount.

Attorneys for the city responded to a lawsuit challenging the Casper’s petition signature verification process.

The lawsuit was filed by a group called Keep Casper Smoke Free, which circulated the petition. The petition fell 61 signatures short of the number it needed to put the issue on the ballot. The group maintains some signatures it collected were wrongly thrown out and wants a recount.

But in its reply, the city maintains that it did not act “arbitrarily or capriciously” while verifying the signatures.

The Casper Star-Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/158UHDZ) that city also argues the state court has no right to review the complaint.


Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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